As the MDX got bigger and pricier, Acura needed a new entry-level crossover SUV. Consequently, came the Acura RDX based on the same platform as Honda’s Civic and CR-V models. By its 3rd-generation, however, the RDX is now being built on its own exclusive platform.

After making a debut on the 2006 New York Auto Show, and going for sale later in the same year, the RDX adopted Acura’s plenum grille and also featured front-wheel drive. What made the RDX standout, though, was its 2.3-liter inline-4. It was one of the only SUVs of that era to be powered by a four-cylinder engine.

Then in the second generation, Acura replaced its straight-four with a 3.5-liter V6 and mated it to simpler AWD setup, which besides cutting cost also improved its EPA estimated MPG ratings. Now in its 3rd iteration, debuted at the 2018 North American International Auto Show, the 2019 Acura RDX is definitely a lot more explosive.

In fact, an exclusive RDX, with a 350 hp engine, made a run a Colorado’s Pikes Peak Hill Climb racing and featured a new True Touchpad interface with a 10.2-inch widescreen HD display. Other specifications included magnetorheological dampers, 360-degree surround-view exterior cameras, panoramic glass moonroof, acoustic front door glass, an automotive head-up display, and 4-way power lumbar front seats and 16-way power front seats.

Starting at a price of $37.600, the Acura RDX offers more than just luxury. It offers the kind of character and spirit you need to get a better handle on things.

Pros

  • Driver Safety Aids comes as a standard feature
  • Comfortable back seat

Cons

  • Infotainment needs to be improve
  • Transition btw electric and gas motor feels clumsy

Acura RDX Brochures By Year

Model Name and Make
Link
2020 Acura RDX Brochure
2019 Acura RDX Brochure
2018 Acura RDX Brochure
2017 Acura RDX Brochure

Acura RDX Exterior Pictures

Acura RDX Interior Pictures